Category Archives: News

Event Recap: Social Storytelling

Sourcing & Sharing Your Brand’s Best Stories

As long as there are people, there will be stories. During IABC’s first fall event, social media and marketing strategist Jess Columbo of Med|Ed Digital shared insights on the evolution of storytelling and what it means for communicators. In “Social Storytelling: Sourcing & Sharing Your Brand’s Best Stories,” Jess offered both strategy and tactics for this critical  aspect of connecting with customers, stakeholders and constituents.

Some highlights:

  • Be truthful in your storytelling. Eighty percent of consumers say that the authenticity of your content is why they like your brand.

    CJ Anderson, KJ McAllister and Jess Columbo

    CJ Anderson, KJ McAllister and Jess Columbo

  • It’s not just what your brand is, but who your brand has license to be. If you sell propeller hats, should your brand immediately offer thoughts and prayers regarding serious stories surrounding mass violence?
  • People want to share what belongs to them. When a story relating to your brand reaches a high sharing threshold on social media, it’s because the story belongs to your customers, not to you.
  • Use resources wisely. Creating all your own content is neither strategic nor efficient. Be ready to curate user content, as well as develop your own.
  • Avoid artificial asks. Jess noted Mark Zuckerberg’s famous quote from a November 2011 interview with Charlie Rose: “The question isn’t ‘What do we want to know about people?’ It’s, ‘What do people want to tell about themselves?’”
  • Be good to your employees. When a brand faces a negative story, employees who feel well-treated are three times more likely to share and advocate on behalf of that brand in comparison with employees who don’t feel that way.
  • Digital storytelling is still storytelling. Yes, it’s a new narrative stream that makes our brains work a little differently than with traditional story forms. But these new ways of telling stories don’t change people’s desire for a hook, a hero and a villain.

Delivered at the University Club of Portland, Jess’s energetic, engaging presentation, provided plenty of insights for attendees to discuss as they enjoyed lunch and networked with fellow professionals.

5 Takeaways from Siouxsie Jennett’s “10 Marketing Trends”

Siouxsie Jennett speaking at June 8th IABC EventIABC Oregon-Columbia’s June 8th lunch event at the  University Club of Portland treated guests to insights from Siouxsie Jennett, the CEO and founder of Mambo Media. As the head of a top PDX marketing firm, Siouxsie is an award-winning local marketing expert who helps clients function successfully on a global level.

For the event, Siouxsie discussed ten digital trends that will affect the way companies reach out to customers, increase sales and even attract new talent in an increasingly digital, highly dynamic environment.Daniel Kawamoto and John Hartman

Siouxsie’s presentation was packed with fascinating statistics, examples and ideas about where marketing is headed. Here are five insights that seemed note-worthy:

1) Just call it marketing. “Modern marketing” works too. Nearly all marketing efforts are digital – it’s assumed.

2) We’re digitizing our relationships. By 2020, 85% of all relationships will be digital. But human behavior is still human behavior. Connection, stories and games are ancient human activities people expect to find in the digital world and that should be part of modern marketing.

3) Marketing budgets are growing. Ninety percent of marketing budgets are now digital. This shift means marketers will see their budgets increase as they continue to move from brand awareness campaigns to lead generation with the accompanying metrics that show success.

4) Millennials aren’t giving away their data for nothing. It’s become a cliché to say that millennials don’t care about privacy. But the reality is more nuanced. Yes, they see privacy as a relic, but they don’t give away their infoSiouxsie and 2 female guestsrmation with no strings attached. In exchange for their personal data, this age group expects companies to provide a personalized experience. And they expect all aspects of any online experience to work right the first time.

5) Marketers’ customer care responsibilities will continue to increase. Within the sales funnel, it’s no longer our job to simply attract interest and increase awareness. Consumers will continue to find themselves further and further along in their buying journey before they speak to a human being. Marketers will become even more responsible for nurturing these potential customers before sales teams begin to cultivate relationships with them.

Coming from a background in both marketing and anthropology, Siouxsie brings an impressive understanding of human behavior to the task of forecasting shifts in the marketing industry. As she delved into the ways companies will need to respond to changes in consumers’ online behaviors, it Andrew Thompson Kate Kimball and Guest 2became easy to think of her as the “Margaret Mead of Marketing.”

In trying to share a few takeaways from Siouxsie’s compelling presentation, it’s impossible to match its depth or breadth. Hopefully, these snippets will convince you not to miss an opportunity to hear this unique marketing expert speak in person if you have the chance.

Siouxsie Jennett and the Mambo Media team work with organizations to implement modern marketing programs that increase brand awareness, lead generation, online conversions and e-commerce sales. Mambo builds highly-effective marketing strategies that drive revenue through digital channels including social media, search, email, website development and marketing automation.

March is Member Month

Join or renew your membership by March 31 and save 10% off international dues PLUS we’ll waive the $40 application fee. You’ll also be entered in a drawing to win a FitBit Blaze. https://www.iabc.com/membership

Brand Building: Salt & Straw Grows to Five Stores in Five Years

Oregon-Columbia IABC Board Member Marie Gettel-Gilmarten with speaker Kim Malek of Salt & Straw

Oregon-Columbia IABC Board Member Marie Gettel-Gilmartin (left) with speaker Kim Malek of Salt & Straw

IABC’s event featuring Salt and Straw’s Kim Malek was a great success! Over lunch at the Benson Hotel in Portland, co-founder Kim Malek discussed how she and her cousin, Tyler, built Portland’s favorite ice cream brand.

This popular ice cream company has grown from five employees and a 30-foot freezer to three overflowing shops in Portland and two in Los Angeles…in just five years.  In a short time, Salt & Straw’s fame has spread well beyond Portland; it’s been named editor’s pick by Food & Wine, Bon Appetit, Martha Stewart, Oprah, Saveur, GQ, and Portland Monthly.

Malek painted a compelling picture of marketing through community outreach. She also illustrated the difference between customer service and hospitality—and the ways that hospitality can be a critical tool for growing a brand.

Attendees learned how Malek’s strong background in marketing, along with mentoring from Starbuck’s founder Howard Shultz, enabled the company to grow. Additionally, Malek emphasized that investments in training and employees helped Salt & Straw become a place where customers feast on small batch, handmade, local ice cream made from natural dairy with the best local, organic, and sustainable ingredients.

After an inspiring discussion, a delicious lunch, and networking with other professionals,  attendees enjoyed three scrumptious Salt & Straw’s flavors: Strawberry Honey Balsamic, Almond Brittle with Salted Ganache, and Sea Salt with Caramel Ribbons.

Thanks to our wonderful speaker and all who attended this fantastic event!

 

Did you attend Cultivate Critical Connections in February?

anna_browneby Anna Browne, Senior Editor and Writer for The Standard

No matter where you are in your career, it’s still your career. Where you’ve worked and what kind of communicating you’ve done is defined by your unique experiences. So whether you’ve had a lot of years of experience or only a few, it’s always fascinating to hear about the careers of other communicators. What are they working on? What deadlines and challenges do they face? How much does social media play a role? How much critical planning or measurement do they really do? Continue reading